“Weak men make us nervous. Gentle men make us calm.” -Marianne Williamson

“Usually, when we think of power, we think of external power. And we think of powerful people as those who have made it in the world. A powerful woman isn’t necessarily someone who has money, but we think of her as someone with a boldness or a spark that makes her manifest in a dramatic way. When we think of a powerful man, we think of his ability to manifest abundance, usually money, in the world.

Most people say that a powerful woman does best with a powerful man, that she needs someone who understands the bigness of her situation, a man who can meet her at the same or even greater level of power in the world.

Now this is true, if power is defined as material abundance. A woman often faces cultural prejudice when she makes more money than a man, as does he. A woman who defines power by worldly standards can rarely feel totally relaxed in the arms of a man who doesn’t have it.

If power is seen as an internal matter, then the situation changes drastically. Internal power has less to do with money and worldly position, and more to do than with emotional expansiveness, spirituality and conscious living…

I used to think I needed a powerful man, someone who could protect me from the harshness and evils of the world. What I have come to realize is that…the powerful man I was looking for would be foremost, someone who supported me in keeping myself on track spiritually, and in so maintaining clarity within myself, that life would present fewer problems. When it did get rough, he would help me forgive.

I no longer wanted somebody who would say to me, “Don’t worry honey, if they’re mean to you I’ll beat them up or buy them out.” Instead, I want someone who prays and meditates with me regularly so that fewer monsters from the outer world disturb me, and who when they do, helps me look within my own consciousness for answers, instead of looking to false power to combat false power.

There’s a big difference between a gentle man and a weak man. Weak men make us nervous. Gentle men make us calm.”
― Marianne Williamson

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The Homecoming -Jeff Foster

THE HOMECOMING

The more free and transparent you become,
the more you’re constantly
bewildered by yourself.

Because you’re no longer stuck
in some mental image
of how you ‘should’ be,
how you ‘should’ think or feel or act.

You’ve lost the old reference points.
Even the ‘spiritual’ ones.

You’re more and more of a mystery to yourself,
yet you know yourself more deeply than ever.
How can this be?

More bewildered than ever,
yet rock solid in Knowing?

Yes. Awakening doesn’t make you into a special person.
An expert. A guru. A perfect being. The best.

It makes you as vast as the night sky.
It returns you to Wonder. To the Wild.
It destroys ‘you’ as you knew yourself.

You know so much less.
But you Know so much more.

You are imperfect but you are free.

It is a divine bewilderment.
It is a second childhood.
It is a homecoming.

Thank you life, for making me doubt
everything I thought I knew.

And guiding me back
to Source.

– Jeff Foster

Perfectly Imperfect

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“The marks life leaves on everything it touches transform perfection into wholeness. Older, wiser cultures choose to claim this wholeness in the things that they create. In Japan, Zen gardeners purposefully leave a fat dandelion in the midst of the exquisite, ritually precise patterns of the meditation garden. In Iran, even the most skilled of rug weavers includes an intentional error, the “Persian Flaw,” in the magnificence of a Tabriz or Qashqai carpet…and Native Americans wove a broken bead, the “spirit bead,” into every beaded masterpiece. Nothing that has a soul is perfect. When life weaves a spirit bead into your very fabric, you may stumble upon a wholeness greater than you had dreamed possible before.”

― Rachel Naomi Remen, My Grandfather’s Blessings : Stories of Strength, Refuge, and Belonging